Cowgirl Bonnie McCarroll is thrown from a horse named Silver during a bucking contest at Pendleton Round-Up. After the Round-Up started in 1910, cowgirls were stars until McCarroll was killed in a bronc-riding accident in 1929.
Photographer: Walter S. Bowman, September 1915.
 

Cowgirl Bonnie McCarroll is thrown from a horse named Silver during a bucking contest at Pendleton Round-Up. After the Round-Up started in 1910, cowgirls were stars until McCarroll was killed in a bronc-riding accident in 1929. Photographer: Walter S. Bowman, September 1915.  

The Oregon Historical Society. #94089

 

  

  • Sara Boone became Portland Fire and Rescue’s first African-American female firefighter when she joined the agency in 1995. Now, she’s the city’s first African-American fire chief. We sit down with Boone to talk about her career and her plans for the agency.

 

  

  • A federal judge is allowing a case to move forward that pits Oregon’s wine and cannabis industries against each other. A McMinnville vineyard says a neighboring cannabis farm is contaminating the vineyard’s grapes with the smell of marijuana. The conflict began not long after the farm began operations. Industry lawyer Alex Tinker tells us more about what could become a precedent-setting case.

 

  

  • In the early 20th Century, American cowgirls and cowboys often competed in similar rodeo events. But after famed cowgirl Bonnie McCarroll died in a tragic accident at the 1929 Pendleton Round-Up, everything started to change. We hear from historian Bill Willingham about McCarroll, and Nicole Schrock, the organizer of a growing annual all-girls Oregon rodeo.

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