Members of The Slants pose for a photo. From left to right, guitarist Joe X. Xiang, vocalist Ken Shima, bass and bandleader Simon Tam, and drummer Yuya Matsuda.

Members of The Slants pose for a photo. From left to right, guitarist Joe X. Xiang, vocalist Ken Shima, bass and bandleader Simon Tam, and drummer Yuya Matsuda.

Courtesy of The Slants

 

  

  • Portland-based band The Slants is retiring after 13 years of making music together. The band made national headlines in 2017 after the Supreme Court ruled that The Slants could trademark their name. Founder Simon Tam said he’ll focus now on writing and activism. The Slants’ last show will be Nov. 4 at the Doug Fir in Portland. Tam will be talking about his memoir “Slanted” at Powell’s City of Books Nov. 3.

 

  

  • Herman Anderson, a rancher and member of the Klamath Tribes, competed in the Indian National Finals Rodeo team roping competition in Las Vegas last weekend. Though he didn’t win big, Anderson comes from a long tradition of rodeo. His family started the Klamath Indian Rodeo Association, and his father, Miller Anderson, was a successful professional rodeo cowboy.

 

  

  • Metro, the regional government for Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties, voted to approve guidelines that will benefit women and people of color who want to enter the construction industry. Metro councilor Juan Carlos Gonzalez, carpenter foreman Tanda Lovenguth, and president and owner of O’Neill Construction Group Maurice Rahming explain the program and the benefits of more diversity in construction.

 

  

  • A new study by University of Oregon professors looked at the reasons why consumers trust and believe the news they read, watch and listen to. Assistant professor Jesse Abdenour is one of the study’s authors and said that narrative engagement is a significant factor in whether consumers said they trusted the piece and believed the facts in the story. We talk with Abdenour about the study and its implications in the current social and political environment, and the implications for media outlets on their climate change coverage and science reporting.

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