Oregon Children's Theatre is presenting "The Journal of Ben Uchida," which tells the story of a Japanese American family who was imprisoned in camps during World War II.

Oregon Children’s Theatre is presenting “The Journal of Ben Uchida,” which tells the story of a Japanese American family who was imprisoned in camps during World War II.

Courtesy of Oregon Children’s Theatre

 

  

  • As a legislative stalemate brought the Capitol to a standstill this week in Oregon, Republicans have been adamant: They’ll return to work if Democrats agree to put their landmark climate change proposal before voters. In the meantime, only three bills have passed so far this legislative session. And many more are left on the table. OPB political reporter Lauren Dake tells us about all the other legislative efforts aside from cap and trade that are now at a standstill this session.

 

  

  • Huge murals painted on the walls of the Grant High School auditorium nearly 90 years ago depict white settlers and Native Americans existing in peace and harmony. A planned restoration of these murals has ignited fierce opposition from many students at the school, including the Indigenous Peoples Student Union. They say the depictions are ahistorical and offensive, and they want the murals removed. The Grant High Alumni Association, which has raised money for the restoration with the approval of Portland Public Schools, favors restoring the painting. It wants to use the paintings as a way to educate students about the actual history of whites and Indigenous people, and provide other supplemental art at the school that would do this. Our guests are Grant High School Alumni Association’s Bob Erickson; Indigenous Peoples Student Union representative, Aanii Tate; Nina Olsson, a conservator of paintings who’s contracted to restore the murals; and Grant High School principal, Carol Campbell.

 

  

  • The Oregon Children’s Theatre is presenting “The Journal of Ben Uchida,” a play about a Japanese American family that is relocated from their home and imprisoned in detention camps during World War II. Actor David Loftus’s family was imprisoned in the World War II camps in California and Wyoming. He and the play’s director, Dmae Roberts, join us to discuss what audiences today can learn from the play.

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