Three people sit together at a park picnic area. At least two of them are seated in wheelchairs.
Courtesy Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

Oregon state parks to become more accessible to people with disabilities

State parks will become much more accessible under a new plan from the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Doors, parking lots and restrooms account for about half of the existing barriers for people with disabilities. Those should take about five years to fix, but the full plan is expected to take about 25 years. Advocates for people with disabilities say they’re heartened that parks will be brought into compliance with the federal Americans With Disabilities Act, passed more than 30 years ago.

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Ruling gives Oregon lawmakers a chance to redraw political maps

Oregon lawmakers have been battling Secretary of State Shemia Fagan in court over who gets to draw political boundaries based on the latest census data. The Oregon Supreme Court sided with lawmakers in a ruling Friday. OPB political reporter Dirk VanderHart fills us in.


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Portland’s new Lilith Clinic provides reproductive health services otherwise lacking for those in need

The Lovejoy Surgicenter closed its doors in January, leaving many Portlanders and others seeking abortion services without a place to go. The Lilith Clinic opened last month and aims to fill the gap left by Lovejoy. Oregon is unique in that it does not have state restrictions on abortion, but access remains an issue. Many counties do not have any abortion providers at all.


A man wears a Columbia Sportswear light fleece jacket and glasses in a park.

Community organizer offers ideas to prevent gun violence in Portland

We hear from Lakayana Drury about his detailed proposal for getting at some of the root causes for gun and gang violence. The plan includes offering direct financial support as well as wraparound services to at-risk youth and free access to college for students who are Black, Indigenous or other people of color.



View from the chapel library at the Oregon State Penitentiary.

Vaccine acceptance rate among prisoners at 70%

The Oregon Department of Corrections has offered a COVID-19 vaccine to every inmate in custody. Nearly 70% of people in prison have given consent to be vaccinated. After months of outbreaks and 42 COVID-related deaths in Oregon prisons, there are currently 9 active COVID cases in state prisons, down from a high of 730.


Clackamas County students navigate the pandemic through art

Artwork from more than 100 students is featured in a virtual art show hosted by the Clackamas Education Service District. The art pieces represent students from school districts throughout Clackamas County. The works illustrate the students' feelings and emotions as they navigate the pandemic. Bonnie Kayser is an art educator at Clackamas High School and curated pieces from her students. Hannah Olson is a sophomore at Clackamas High School and has art in the show.



People hold signs on street corner. Some of the messages on the signs include: "Racism is a virus," and "Stop Asian Hate."

Racism, violence against Asian American Pacific Islander community taking heavy toll

Reported acts of racism, violence and hate crimes directed at members of the Asian American Pacific Islander community have increased significantly during the pandemic. Last month, eight people, including six Asian-American women, were shot and killed in Atlanta, Georgia. The attacks have had a profound impact on mental health for many in the AAPI community.



photo of a blockbuster rental video

Documentary about Bend’s Blockbuster streams on Netflix

At its peak, renting a movie from Blockbuster was a common experience for many households. But thousands of Blockbuster locations were slowly whittled down to one on the planet. And it’s in Bend. “The Last Blockbuster,” a documentary about the lone location, is streaming on Netflix. Taylor Morden is the director of the film and Zeke Kamm is the writer. They join us to tell us more about the film and the iconic location left in Bend.



How the pandemic has changed homeless services

Some of the changes include allowing more camps and homeless villages, paying for people to stay in motels and more access to public restrooms.


Students walk across the University of Oregon campus on a rainy March day in this 2015 file photo.

College students say tuition and other costs are too high

For many college students, how to afford their education is never far from their minds. They’re dealing with rising prices for food, housing, textbooks and tuition. Oregon State University and the University of Oregon were recently named in lawsuits filed on behalf of students who object to paying for facilities and other in-person experiences while classes were online. Isaiah Boyd is the president of the University of Oregon’s student government. Isabel Nuñez Pérez is Oregon State University’s student government president. They join us to share their thoughts and experience about paying for college.


A close up of a protester's sign, which reads "It's time to act!" in bright colors.

Environmental advocates track Oregon agencies’ progress on climate action goals

A year ago, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown issued an executive order creating the Oregon Climate Action Plan. The plan called on state agencies to take action to reduce and regulate greenhouse gas emissions. Now, a coalition of environmental advocacy groups has put out a detailed progress report to hold those agencies accountable for following the governor's directive.


South Salem High School senior Eddy Binford-Ross is editor-in-chief of the student newspaper.

Salem-Keizer school board contributions under the microscope as election nears

Eddy Binford-Ross has been looking into some unusual financial contributions from special interest groups to Salem-Keizer School Board members and candidates. She reports meticulously on her findings in The Clypian, the student newspaper at South Salem High School where Binford-Ross is a senior and the paper’s editor-in-chief.



Poet Ross Gay focuses on everyday delights

Sometimes a flower or a bird or an overheard snippet of conversation is enough to bring joy. Perhaps especially in a year like this one, focusing on the small things is important. That’s something poet Ross Gay spent a long time doing for his latest collection of essays, “The Book of Delights.” Gay’s definition of delight is expansive and palpable, and his essays range from the smallest of natural wonders to the largest of societal problems. This year, Multnomah County Library is encouraging everybody to read “The Book of Delights.”

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