This complex off of River Road and Division Avenue will host the Coquille Tribe's new clinic after some remodeling work is done. The existing tenants (Gentle Dental, Willamette Valley Mammography, and Axis Physical Therapy) will remain.

This complex off of River Road and Division Avenue will host the Coquille Tribe's new clinic after some remodeling work is done. The existing tenants (Gentle Dental, Willamette Valley Mammography, and Axis Physical Therapy) will remain.

Brian Bull

The Coquille Indian Tribe, whose members have traditionally lived on the Oregon Coast, is opening an outpatient medical clinic inland in the Willamette Valley.

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The tribe’s already developing a wellness center in Coos Bay, but citing the “Potlatch Tradition” of sharing resources, Coquille officials say they’re starting a new one in Eugene, more than 100 miles away, where an estimated 6,000 Indigenous people live.

The Coquille Tribe Executive Director Mark Johnston said the clinic will start in soon, then expanding to full services in April.

“We will initially begin providing flu shot clinics and some COVID testing here by the end of the month,” Johnston told KLCC earlier in December.  “Our special message to all the American Indian/Alaskan Natives who live in Lane County and even outside Lane County, that we’re looking forward to serving them, and that we’ll be open as soon as we can for them.”

The new clinic will incorporate culturally sensitive elements in both its design and application of health and medicine. It’ll be based in the North Eugene/Santa Clara area next to an existing dental clinic and physical therapy center.  The Coquille Tribe purchased the 13,000 square foot building with help from a $900,000 Indian Community Development Block Grant from the federal Housing and Urban Development Department.

Copyright 2020, KLCC.

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