Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced updated risk levels Tuesday for counties under the state’s public health guidelines aimed at reducing the transmission of coronavirus.

The risk categories affect how open businesses can be, and what the state recommendations are for groups of people gathering.

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Two counties remain in the “extreme risk” category: Coos and Curry counties.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown.

Office of Kate Brown

Fourteen counties are considered to be “low risk,” including Baker, Jefferson, Lane and Yamhill, which were all downgraded from higher risk categories.

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The Portland metro area counties of Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington will remain in the “moderate risk” category.

Josephine and Klamath counties will enter into a “two week caution period” later this week due to backward movement, as they have seen an increase in COVID-19 spread.

“As we work to open up vaccine eligibility to all Oregonians by May 1, we are seeing the light at the end of the tunnel get a little brighter. But, we still have more work to do to reach the level of community-wide protection we need,” Brown wrote in a news release.

The Oregon Health Authority announced Monday that 13 counties could begin vaccinating agricultural workers, people experiencing homelessness and other vulnerable populations in an effort to speed up the state’s vaccination timeline.

“I encourage all Oregonians to keep wearing your masks, maintain physical distance, stay home when sick, and get your vaccine when it’s available to you,” Brown said.

The updated risk levels go into effect Friday and continue until April 8.


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