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Arts & Life

'Crazy Rich Asians': Love, Loyalty And Lots Of Money

NPR

The best-selling novel about Southeast Asia's super wealthy is now a movie. Jon Chu is the director. The movie's themes of identity, class and family are universal.

Finding, Then Filming, The Young All-Female Crew In 'Skate Kitchen'

NPR

Director Crystal Moselle stumbled upon a group of teenage skater girls on the New York City subway. Then she made a feature film that stars them.

Jazz In The 21st Century Is All About 'Playing Changes'

NPR

Nate Chinen's new book Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century identifies the key players in the genre's resurgence. Chinen's aim with the books is to get the root of the resurgence.

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Arts | Entertainment | Music

Not My Job: We Quiz Wilco's Jeff Tweedy On 'A Yankee, A Hotel, And A Foxtrot'

As a kid Tweedy lied about knowing how to play the guitar, but he must have figured it out eventually because he went on to form the bands Uncle Tupelo and Wilco.

Arts | Music

Nico Biopic Sheds Light On Her Life Before And After The Velvet Underground

Nico, 1988 tells the story of the Velvet Underground singer who left for a solo career — one weighed down by her addiction to heroin — and depicts the last, tumultuous year of her life.

Arts | Books

V.S. Naipaul, Controversial Author And Nobel Laureate, Dies At 85

Naipaul was born in Trinidad, and his relationship to his birthplace was nothing if not complicated. He was often criticized for the way he depicted developing countries in his novels.

Arts | Books

'The Line That Held Us': Noir In Appalachia

Novelist David Joy, whose books chronicle the rural, working-class South of his own milieu, has penned a new book where a hunting accident triggers a thriller of violent vengeance.

Arts

'I Wasn't Sure If It Was True': John David Washington On The 'BlacKkKlansman' Story

In director Spike Lee's latest film, BlacKkKlansman, John David Washington plays Ron Stallworth, a black police detective who successfully infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in the 1970s.

Arts | Entertainment | Food

African-American Craft Beer Brewers Unite To Host A Festival Of Their Own

Craft beer is booming, but it is not very popular in the African American community, and there are few black brewers. The first craft beer festival for African American brewers aims to change that.

Arts | Entertainment

Changes Are Coming To The Oscars

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is making three major changes, a move that on its face looks like a tie to weak ratings.

Arts | Entertainment

'Insatiable' Is Lazy And Dull, But At Least It's Insulting

The new Netflix series Insatiable got early attention for stereotyping its fat-to-skinny lead character, but it's not as bad as all that. It's worse.

Arts | Entertainment | Books

Yabbadabba-What? These Aren't The Flintstones You Remember

When you say The Flintstones, most people think of the old Hanna Barbera cartoons. But a new comic book adaptation keeps the humor, and tackles some heavy themes like capitalism and human frailty.

Arts | Entertainment

Remembering Charlotte Rae: Her Voice Quavered, Her Comic Timing Didn't

Charlotte Rae snagged the role of Mrs. Garrett in 1978, a time when sitcoms were driven by catchphrases. But it was her delivery that turned a stock matronly character into a starring role.

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Oregon Art Beat

Put a Bird on It (1912)

August 16, 8 p.m. [OPB TV]