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Myth And Reality About Hurricane Risks For Expectant Mothers

NPR

Research suggests that floods and other environmental disasters can raise the risk for spontaneous miscarriages, preterm births and low-birth-weight infants. Doctors say it pays to be prepared.

Do IVF And Other Infertility Tech Lead To Health Risks For The Baby? Maybe

NPR

A small study of teens who were conceived via assisted reproductive technology finds a significant number already have hypertension and premature "age-related changes" in their blood vessels.

Have A Cool Idea To Help End World Hunger? Pitch It To The U.N.

NPR

At the World Food Programme's Innovation Accelerator, teams test out new proposals to stop hunger. Anyone can submit. And September deadlines are coming up.

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World | Health

Which Foreign Aid Programs Work? The U.S. Runs A Test — But Won't Talk About It

USAID has launched a series of experiments to see how traditional aid compares to giving people cash. The first results are in. And they're proving controversial.

World | Health

Why The U.S. Ranks At The Bottom In A Foreign Aid Index

In an assessment of the quantity and quality of aid from 27 wealthy countries, the United States ranked poorly.

World | Health

What The Yom Kippur Fast Means To A Man Who's Known Hunger

Shadrach Mugoya Levi is the spiritual leader of a community of Uganda Jews. After a year of study in Jerusalem, he says he's more prepared than ever for the Day of Atonement.

Health

Doctors Today May Be Miserable, But Are They 'Burnt Out'?

There's a lively debate going on in the medical community about physician burnout. Who has it? How bad is it? Is it even real?

Science | Health

Childhood Trauma And Its Lifelong Health Effects More Prevalent Among Minorities

The largest study of its kind shows a high prevalence of adverse childhood experiences — or ACEs — across the population, but especially among some vulnerable groups.

Food | Nation | Health

Doctors Should Send Obese Patients To Diet Counseling, Panel Says. But Many Don't

Behavior-based weight-loss programs that focus on diet and exercise can work for obese patients, a national panel of experts says. But many doctors aren't having the necessary conversations.

Science | Health

Infectious Theory Of Alzheimer's Disease Draws Fresh Interest

Money has poured into Alzheimer's research, but until very recently not much of it went toward investigating infection in causing dementia. A million dollar prize may lead more scientists to try.

Books | Science | Music | Health

This Rapper Tried To Use Neuroscience To Get Over Her Ex

Dessa is a singer and writer from Minneapolis who spent years trying to fall out of love and get over her ex. Nothing seemed to help — until she visited a research lab for a brain scan.

Food | Science | Nation | Health

Biologist Wants Americans To Taste A Rainbow Of Pomegranates

As a child, John Chater remembers trying different kinds of pomegranates in his grandfather's yard. It spurred him to pursue a dream of diversifying America's crop beyond the red Wonderful variety.

Nation | Health

As Injuries Continue, Doctors Renew Call For Ban On Infant Walkers

Despite improved safety standards over the years, more than 230,000 children under 15 months old were treated in hospital emergency rooms for injuries related to infant walkers from 1990 through 2014.

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