Candace Avalos, PSU student advisor, at her first protest in June 2020. Avalos, along with other Black leaders in Portland, has received threatening letters.

Candace Avalos, PSU student advisor, at her first protest in June 2020. Avalos, along with other Black leaders in Portland, has received threatening letters.

Courtesy of Candace Avalos / Courtesy of Candace Avalos

THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR:

Reports of hate crimes, harassment and other bias incidents have increased in Oregon recently. The Oregon Department of Justice has received a sharp increase in calls to its bias crime hotline since May, when protests against racial injustice began across the state. In recent weeks, several Black leaders in Portland have received letters threatening their lives. Candace Avalos, a Portland State University student advisor and co-founder of the Black Millennial Movement, was among those threatened in the letters. Lindsey Schubiner, director of the Momentum program at the Western States Center links the rise in hate to white nationalist groups.

Contact “Think Out Loud®”

If you’d like to comment on any of the topics in this show, or suggest a topic of your own, please get in touch with us on Facebook or Twitter, send an email to thinkoutloud@opb.org, or you can leave a voicemail for us at 503-293-1983. The call-in phone number during the noon hour is 888-665-5865.

THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR:
THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR:
THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR:

Related Stories

The Oregon Desert Trail is the state's newest long-distance trail, charting a rugged course through the heart of the state's high desert.

‘Walking the High Desert’

Ellen Waterston was a rancher in Oregon’s high desert sagebrush before she moved to Bend to live in the city. But she never lost her love for the desert and the people who live there. Waterston’s newest book, “Walking the High Desert,” chronicles her exploration of parts of the Oregon Desert Trail, and her conversations about issues that govern the lives of people living in that remarkable terrain.