Companies that allow customers to summon a ride using an app on their phone have exploded in popularity over the past few years.

So far in Oregon, it's largely fallen to local communities to regulate them.

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On Monday, the Oregon House's Business and Labor Committee will hear a series of proposals that would regulate ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft.

Some would create statewide standards for things like insurance and background checks, but allow local communities to regulate the day-to-day operations of the businesses.

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Other bills would take regulatory control out of cities and counties and put it in the hands of the state.

Democratic Rep. Susan McLain of Hillsboro said either way, the goal is to make sure drivers are insured, pass background checks and safely operate their vehicles.

"We have a lot out there that's on the horizon for new technology, and we just have to make sure that we have really researched, reviewed and put into place regulations that will keep our public safe," McLain said.

An Oregon-based lobbyist for Uber said the company prefers a statewide model that would largely pre-empt local communities from passing their own regulations.

Jon Isaacs said the bill Uber favors is based on statewide regulations that are on the books in more than three dozen other states.

But he added the company is also supporting a possible amendment to the measure that would grandfather in the regulations in effect in the city of Portland.

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