“Junk” food is often villainized by members of the foodie establishment, but Dr. Marcia Chatelain’s book, “Franchise,” paints a more nuanced portrait. She kicks off Episode 81 with the paradoxical story of the McDonald’s restaurant chain, which can be seen as both a champion of civil rights and a predatory business model.

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FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2009 file photo shows the red and yellow signs with the trademark golden arches a McDonald's in Pittsburgh. McDonald's on Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014 said a key sales figure declined 3.3 percent in the U.S., marking the fourth straight quarter of declines for the world's biggest hamburger chain. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

This Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2009 file photo shows the red and yellow signs with the trademark golden arches a McDonald's in Pittsburgh.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Next, eating disorders are typically viewed as affecting privileged white women. Whitney Trotter, nutritionist and body-positive therapist, paints a different picture. In marginalized communities where “junk” food restaurants are the prevailing options, Trotter treats patients who struggle with internal conflict over the foods that are available to them.

Finally, Roxane Gay leads our conversation on the culturally entitled pastime of passing judgments on foods and bodies. Gay, author of the bestselling book Hunger, encourages constructive conversations about fatphobia and fatness.

Meet our panelists: Dr. Marcia Chatelain is author and distinguished professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University. Whitney Trotter, MS, RD, LDN, RN, BSN, is founder of Bluff City Health in Memphis and cofounder and board director of Restore Corp. And Roxane Gay is an author, advice columnist and contributing op-ed writer for The New York Times.

Our host is Katherine Cole. This episode was recorded remotely in locations across the United States. Stay safe out there.

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