The Oregon Health Authority has reported the state’s first probable case of monkeypox.

Confirmation testing is being done at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The patient is a man who traveled to a country where monkeypox is currently prevalent, OHA said. He remains isolated and is following recommendations from health professionals, state health officials said on Thursday.

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Monkeypox, known formally as hMPXV, typically requires prolonged, close contact to spread from person to person.

“hMPXV does not spread easily between people, so the risk to other people is generally very low,” said Dr. Richard Leman with the Oregon Health Authority. “hMPXV spreads between people primarily through direct contact with infectious sores, scabs, or body fluids. Less commonly, it can be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged face-to-face contact.”

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State health officials say initial symptoms include fever, headache and muscle aches, followed by a rash that starts with flat patches that form into large fluid-filled bumps. These bumps scab and fall off in two to four weeks. Symptoms usually start within seven to 14 days after exposure.

Currently, there are 84 cases across 18 states. No deaths have been reported.

Last month, Washington reported the state’s first case.

A vaccine can be given to people who have been exposed, under certain circumstances. It works to prevent the virus or decrease the impact after someone has been exposed. Health officials said members of the public who haven’t been exposed don’t need this vaccine.



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