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Can We Change The Past?

NPR

Putting humans and consciousness aside, at the level of quantum particles, Wheeler's Delayed-Choice experiments show that actions in the present can influence the past, says physicist Marcelo Gleiser.

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

NPR

A 51-year-old man nearly died from septic shock, when a crushing injury led to overwhelming infection. After getting an experimental treatment, he's recovering well, but some doctors want more proof.

Arizona's Tepary Beans Preserve A Native Past, Hold Promise For The Future

KJZZ

Local Native Americans grew teparies for centuries, but the beans began to sink into obscurity. Now, thanks to seed preservation and farmers who want to preserve the past, they're making a comeback.

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Technology | Science | Health

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

More than a third of patients with cancer of the esophagus responded to experimental treatment in China with the gene-editing technique CRISPR. Several CRISPR studies are underway there.

Food | Nation | World | Science | Environment

Like Lemons? Quinoa? Thank This Food Explorer For Bringing Them To Your Plate

In the early 20th century, botanist David Fairchild traveled the world and brought plants back to the U.S. that we now see as thoroughly American. NPR talks with the author of a book on Fairchild.

Health | Nation | Science | Environment

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

Privately funded scientists made a virus related to smallpox from scratch, hoping their version might lead to a better smallpox vaccine. But critics question the need, and worry about repercussions.

Nation | Science | Health

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune System

Their first epiphanies came during musings over beer, and evolved into a decade of teamwork. Two Harvard researchers explain why they think Alzheimer's disease may be traced to an immunity glitch.

Nation | Science | Flora and Fauna | Environment

Seismic Surveys Planned Off U.S. Coast Pose Risk To Marine Life

The Trump administration could give companies permission to set off sonic explosions to explore for oil and gas deposits. Scientists say this could seriously harm marine life.

Nation | Science | Health

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

When many lymph nodes are removed along with a tumor, some patients develop painful and debilitating swelling — lymphedema. More doctors should recognize and help prevent the problem, surgeons say.

Nation | Science | Health

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

The HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer in women and some cancers in men. It's most effective when given early in adolescence. But a new analysis finds only 29 percent of teens get it by age 13.

Food | Nation | Technology | Science | Health

Scientists Develop A Way To Use A Smartphone To Prevent Food Poisoning

A microscope that clips on to your phone's camera can detect bacteria, such as salmonella or E. coli, even in tiny amounts. But the technology can't yet distinguish between good and bad bacteria.

Science | Election

'Strong' Black Woman? 'Smart' Asian Man? The Downside To Positive Stereotypes

It's not hard to spin a positive stereotype as a compliment. But making any generalization about a group is a slippery slope.

Nation | Science | Environment

Top EPA Science Adviser Has History Of Questioning Pollution Research

Michael Honeycutt, the top toxicologist for Texas, is the latest chair of the EPA's science advisory board. But some scientists warn his views align more with industry than with scientific consensus.