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Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

NPR

As many as 40 percent of students who intend to go to college don't show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem.

The Science Behind South Korea's Race-Based World Cup Strategy

NPR

South Korea's men's soccer team tried to confuse scouts from Sweden's team by swapping jerseys so their opponent couldn't tell the players apart. But could a strategy like that actually work?

Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The Stars

NPR

The president wants a "separate but equal branch" of the military to watch over the final frontier. But only Congress can make it happen.

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Business | Science | Health

'Cutting Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

With 113 locations in the U.S., Brain Balance says its drug-free approach has helped tens of thousands of children. But experts say there's insufficient proof for its effectiveness.

Nation | Health | Science

Stay-At-Home Dads Still Struggle With Diapers, Drool, Stigma And Isolation

It's hard to find other stay-at-home dads to hang out with, and working men worry you'll hit on their stay-at-home wives. Meanwhile, bosses still expect new fathers to work full-time. What's changed?

Agriculture | Environment | News | Fish & Wildlife | local | Science

Bumblebee Blues: Pacific Northwest Pollinator In Trouble

Bumblebees are important pollinators, but some species have disappeared from places where they were once common, possibly because of the same factors that have been killing honeybees.

Environment | Business | Science | Health

Fear And Frustration Over EPA Move To Kill Chemical-Disaster Protections

The EPA intends to block rules to prevent and respond to leaks, explosions and other disasters at chemical facilities and refineries around the U.S. That scares many people who live and work nearby.

Education | Nation | Health | Science

The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off

Part of a parent's job is to help kids do their best, but pushing too hard can backfire. Some parents are learning to balance the focus on success with an emphasis on well-being.

Environment | Energy | Business | Nation | Science

As Nuclear Struggles, A New Generation Of Engineers Is Motivated By Climate Change

The number of people graduating with nuclear engineering degrees has more than tripled since 2001. Many say they are motivated by climate change.

Food | Science | Health

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

Giving kids a diet varied in flavors and textures from the get-go can help them be more open to trying new foods. The problem is America's food landscape makes that ideal hard to live up to.

Science | Health

Credibility Concerns Lead NIH To End Study Of Alcohol's Health Effects

Scientists and National Institutes of Health officials met with alcohol company executives and appeared to solicit money from them in violation of government policy. The NIH canceled the study.

World | Science

Stephen Hawking's Voice Is Being Broadcast Into Space

The late scientist's voice will be "beamed toward the nearest black hole," his daughter tells the British press. Hawking is being interred at Westminster Abbey on Friday.

Science | Health

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

200 medications have depression as a possible side effect. Now, a new study finds people who take these drugs are, in fact, more likely to be depressed. The more drugs you take, the higher the risk.