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EPA Boasts Of Reduced Greenhouse Gases, Even As Trump Questions Climate Science

NPR

U.S. production of heat-trapping greenhouse gases fell 2.7 percent last year. But larger cuts will be needed to address climate change.

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

NPR

A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone.

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

NPR

Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people.

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Science | Health

Distrust Of Health Care System May Keep Black Men Away From Prostate Cancer Research

Black men are hit hardest by prostate cancer, but they are underrepresented in research. Researchers held focus groups in three states to understand why.

Science | Health | Business

After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever

In 2003, Paul Allen created an institute to figure out how the human brain works. That institute has already made contributions that may turn out to be part of his greatest legacy.

Pacific Ocean | Food | local | News | Recreation | Science

Siletz Bay Crab Clinic Makes Ocean-To-Table Easy … Sort Of

Bill Lackner holds free clamming and crabbing clinics on Siletz Bay every summer. We tag along and see how it's done.

Science | Books

'Brief Answers To The Big Questions' Is Stephen Hawking's Parting Gift To Humanity

The physicist's posthumous book highlights his belief in the rationality of nature and on our ability to uncover its secrets — and a faith in science's ability to solve humanity's biggest problems.

Science | World

Excavation Of Lithuania's Great Synagogue Highlights A 'Painful Page' From History

The synagogue is "very important," says an archaeologist, "not only for Jews but all people living in Lithuania." Just 3,000 Jews are left in the capital, compared to some 70,000 before World War II.

Environment | Food | Climate change | Agriculture | News | Science | Nation

Climate Change Could Make Beer Prices Double, Study Says

The price of a six-pack in the U.S. could rise by $1 to $8 because of drought and heat. As one of the researchers says, it's "another way climate change will suck."

Science | World | Environment | Food

Coffee Rust Threatens Latin American Crop; 150 Years Ago, It Wiped Out An Empire

The fungus, which has no cure, is destroying harvests in Latin America. In the 1800s, it devastated Sri Lanka's powerhouse coffee industry. And scientists say it's only a question of time.

Nation | Science | Health | Business | Economy

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

Sometimes discoveries derived from patients' medical data become the foundation of new profit-making companies. A fledgling industry wants to help patients get a cut of the cash.

Nation | Science | Business | Environment

Critic Of Federal Public Lands Management To Join Department Of The Interior

The Department of the Interior has chosen a prominent property rights attorney in Wyoming as their new deputy solicitor. Its a controversial appointment for environmental groups.

Science | Flora and Fauna

Steven Wise: If Chimpanzees Can Feel And Think, Should They Also Have Legal Rights?

Animals like chimpanzees are autonomous beings with rich emotional lives, says animal rights lawyer Steven Wise. He's working to get courts to recognize them as "legal persons" and grant them rights.