The exterior of the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall

The Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland, Oregon, Saturday, March 11, 2017.

Bradley W. Parks / OPB

After a lengthy hiatus, live performance spaces across Oregon are once again welcoming guests.

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But as the COVID-19 delta variant surges, many venues are quickly adjusting their safety plans.

Metro and Portland 5 Centers for the Arts operate some of Portland’s largest performance venues, including Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, which is reopening in the coming week.

But if you’re going to a show at the Schnitz or any other Portland 5 venue, Executive Director Robyn Williams said, you’ll have to bring something more than just a ticket in order to gain entry.

”Effective immediately, we will be requiring vaccinations or at least 48-hour-proof of being tested and having a negative result,” Williams said.

So what constitutes proof? Williams said a vaccine card or a photo of a valid card will suffice. And all negative result documentation must include the date of the test.

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