According to the Oregon Health Authority, a quarter of Oregon residents rely on wells for their drinking water, and many of them live in rural parts of the state that are particularly vulnerable to wildfires. Freelance journalist and author Erika Bolstad recently wrote about how toxic chemicals like arsenic and benzene can leach into wells after a wildfire, and how droughts and other extreme weather events can increase the concentration of harmful contaminants in well water. She joins us to talk about what she’s learned and whether a free voucher program open to eligible property owners is having an effect.

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